Full reference
Blikstein, P. & Cavallo, D. God hides in the details: design and implementation of technology-enabled learning environments in public education, in Proceedings from Eurologo 2003, Porto, Portugal, August, 2003.

Abstract
Based on case studies conducted in Brazil, this paper proposes a framework to model intervention in education systems using technology. The motivation is to show that innovative learning with expressive technologies can happen even in economically disadvantaged regions, such as public education systems in Brazil. Our analysis reveals the importance building up from the local culture and expertise and fostering mutual trust, elements often disregarded in schools. Technology plays a central role, enabling diverse and innovative ways of working, expressing and sharing. In addition, it makes possible epistemological diversity, empowering of students and fulfilment to teachers, reinforcing the community's livelihood.

Full reference
Sipitakiat, Arnan; Blikstein, Paulo & Cavallo, David, The GoGo Board: Moving towards highly available computational tools in learning environments, In Procedings of the Interactive Computer Aided Learning International Workshop, Carinthia Technology Institute, Villach, Austria, 2002.

Abstract
This paper presents a new framework to tackle the lack of technology availability in learning environments such as schools. The framework is based on the hypothesis that the commonly heard reasons for the scarcity of technology, such as high-cost and complicated budgeting models, are side effects of centralized management styles and an exaggerated belief in the mass-production mindset. The new framework emphasizes communities as producers of their own tools. The GoGo board, a computer-interfacing micro-controller board, is presented as an instantiation of the framework. Preliminary observations of the GoGo board usage and assembly by schoolteachers in Brazil are presented.

Full reference
Sipitakiat, Arnan, Blikstein, Paulo & Cavallo, David. GoGo Board: Augmenting Programmable Bricks for Economically Challenged Audiences, In Proceedings of the International Conference of the Learning Sciences (forthcoming), Los Angeles, USA, 2004.

Abstract
The Programmable Brick, a small autonomous computer with sensing and control abilities, has been a topic of educational research for almost two decades. The use of this tool has now reached beyond research projects through its commercial availability. However, high cost has strictly limited its audience to only well-funded schools and institutions. Can learning activities involving Programmable Bricks take place in an economically challenged context? In this paper, we present an attempt to challenge this question by presenting a new framework that turns the acquisition process of Programmable Bricks and its necessary materials into a rich learning process. We present the GoGo Board, a low-cost Programmable Brick that allows the user to actively participate in its production process. We discuss the use of found and broken materials as sources of construction supplies. We analyze two case studies from projects developed in Brazil from 2002 to 2003. Specifically, we discuss the design aspect of the GoGo board framework that allowed for diverse and socially relevant learning projects to take place.

Full reference
Blikstein, Paulo & Zuffo, Marcelo K. in Silva, Marco (ed.). Online Education: theory, practice, legislation and corporate training. Ed. Loyola, Rio de Janeiro, 2003

Abstract
As novas tecnologias têm um grande potencial para trazer grandes mudanças à educação. Entretanto, vemos que o paradigma da educação tradicional tem preponderado em um grande número de experiências, com o simples encapsulamento de conteúdo instrucional em mídias eletrônicas, apesar do discurso capturado de educadores progressistas. Possíveis causas e conseqüências desse processo são discutidas, como a integração da educação ao universo do consumo de massa, as demandas do novo mundo do trabalho à universidade e as promessas da educação on-line. Ao final, propomos princípios para a construção de ambientes de aprendizagem alternativos, utilizando as tecnologias como matéria-prima de construção e não só como mídia de transmissão de informações.

 

Abstract
Understanding and predicting grain growth in Metallurgy is meaningful. Monte Carlo methods have been used in computer simulations in many different fields of knowledge. Grain growth simulation using this method is especially attractive as

• the statistical behavior of the atoms is properly reproduced;
• microstructural evolution depends only on the real topology of the grains and not on any kind of geometric simplification.

Computer simulation has the advantage of allowing the user to visualize graphically the procedures, even dynamically and in three dimensions. Single-phase alloy grain growth simulation was carried out by calculating the free energy of each atom in the lattice (with its present crystallographic orientation) and comparing this value to another one calculated with a different random orientation. When the resulting free energy is lower or equal to the initial value, the new orientation replaces the former. The measure of time is the Monte Carlo Step (MCS), which involves a series of trials throughout the lattice. A very close relationship between experimental and theoretical values for the grain growth exponent (n) was observed.